Related provisions for PERG 6.7.5

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PERG 5.1.1GRP
This chapter applies principally to any person who needs to know whether he carries on insurance mediation activities and is thereby subject to FCA regulation. As such it will be of relevance among others to:(1) insurance brokers;(2) insurance advisers;(3) insurance undertakings; and(4) other persons involved in the sale and administration of contracts of insurance, even where these activities are secondary to their main business.
PERG 2.7.7BFGRP
8In the FCA's view, a mere passive display of literature advertising investments would not amount to the article 25(2) activity. Further guidance on this point can be found in PERG 5.6.4 G. Although this guidance is in relation to contracts of insurance, the principle is not limited to them.
ICOBS 7.2.4GRP
In most cases, the FCA would expect the proportion of a policy's exposure that relates to the time on risk to be a pro rata apportionment. However, where there is material unevenness in the incidence of risk, an insurer could use a more accurate method. The sum should be reasonable and should not exceed an amount commensurate to the risk incurred.
ICOBS 8.1.2AGRP
(1) 3Cases in which rejection of a consumer’s claim would be unreasonable (in the FCA’s view) include, but are not limited to rejection:(a) for misrepresentation, unless it is a qualifying misrepresentation (see ICOBS 8.1.3R);(b) where the claim is subject to the Insurance Act 2015, for breach of warranty or term, or for fraud, unless the insurer is able to rely on the relevant provisions of the Insurance Act 2015; and(c) where the policy is drafted or operated in a way that does
PERG 6.3.2GRP
The Regulated Activities Order, which sets out the activities for which authorisation is required, does not attempt an exhaustive definition of a 'contract of insurance'. Instead, it makes some specific extensions and limitations to the general common law meaning of the concept. For example, it expressly extends the concept to fidelity bonds and similar contracts of guarantee, which are not contracts of insurance at common law, and it excludes certain funeral plan contracts, which