Related provisions for PERG 5.8.16

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PERG 5.8.9GRP
In general terms, simply giving information, without making any comment or value judgement on its relevance to decisions which a person may make, is not advice. In this respect, it is irrelevant that a person may be providing information on a single contract of insurance or on two or more. This means that a person may provide information on a single contract of insurance without necessarily being regarded as giving advice on it. PERG 5.8.11 G has guidance on the circumstances
PERG 5.8.10GRP
In the case of article 53, information relating to buying or sellingcontracts of insurance may often involve one or more of the following:(1) an explanation of the terms and conditions of a contract of insurance whether given orally or in writing or by providing leaflets and brochures;(2) a comparison of the features and benefits of one contract of insurance compared to another;(3) the production of pre-purchase questions for a person to use in order to exclude options that would
PERG 5.8.11GRP
In the FCA's opinion, however, such information is likely to take on the nature of advice if the circumstances in which it is provided give it the force of a recommendation. Examples of situations where information provided by a person (P) might take the form of advice are given below.(1) P may provide information on a selected, rather than balanced and neutral, basis that would tend to influence the decision of a person. This may arise where P offers to provide information about
PERG 5.8.17GRP
The potential for variation in the form, content and manner of pre-purchase questioning is considerable, but there are two broad types. The first type involves providing questions and answers which are confined to factual matters (for example, the amount of the cover). In the FCA's view, this does not itself amount to advising on contracts of insurance, if it involves the provision of information rather than advice. There are various possible scenarios, including the following:(1)
PERG 5.8.18GRP
The second type of pre-purchase questioning involves providing questions and answers incorporating opinion, judgement or recommendation. There are various possible scenarios, including the following:(1) the pre-purchase questioning may not lead to the identification of any particular contract of insurance; in this case, the questioner has provided advice, but it is generic advice and does not amount to advising on contracts of insurance; and(2) the pre-purchase questioning may
PERG 5.8.19GRP
In the case of PERG 5.8.18G (2) and similar scenarios, the FCA considers that it is necessary to look at the process and outcome of pre-purchase questioning as a whole. It may be that the element of advice incorporated in the questioning can properly be viewed as generic advice if it were considered in isolation. But although the actual advice may be generic, the process has ended in identifying one or more particular contracts of insurance. The combination of the generic advice
PERG 5.8.21GRP
Advice can be provided in many ways including:(1) face to face;(2) orally to a group;(3) by telephone;(4) by correspondence (including e-mail);(5) in a publication, broadcast or web-site; and(6) through the provision of an interactive software system.
PERG 5.8.24GRP
An important exclusion from advising on contracts of insurance relates to advice given in periodical publications, regularly updated news and information services and broadcasts (article 54 of the Regulated Activities Order (Advice given in newspapers etc)). The exclusion applies if the principal purpose of the publication or service taken as a whole (including any advertising content) is neither to give advice of a kind mentioned in article 53 (Advising on investments) or article
PERG 5.16.2GRP
Text of article 2.3 of the Insurance Mediation Directive"'Insurance mediation' means the activities of introducing, proposing or carrying out other work preparatory to the conclusion of contracts of insurance, or of concluding such contracts, or of assisting in the administration and performance of such contracts, in particular in the event of a claim.These activities when undertaken by an insurance undertaking or an employee of an insurance undertaking who is acting under the
GEN 4.2.2GRP
There are other pre-contract information requirements outside this chapter, including:(1) for financial promotions, inthe financial promotion rules;55(2) for designated investment business, inCOBS 8 (Client agreements), COBS 5 (Distance Communications), COBS 6 (Information about the firm, its services and remuneration), COBS 13 and 14 (which relate to product information)5 and CASS (Client assets);5(3) for non-investment insurance contracts3, distance communication requirements
ICOBS 1.1.4GRP
Guidance on the application provisions is in ICOBS 1 Annex 1 (Part 4).
PERG 5.15.4GRP

Types of activity – are they regulated activities and, if so, why?

Type of activity

Is it a regulated activity?

Rationale

MARKETING AND EFFECTING INTRODUCTIONS

Passive display of information -for example, medical insurance brochures in doctor’s surgery (whether or not remuneration is received for this activity)

No.

Merely displaying information does not constitute making arrangements under article 25(2) (see PERG 5.6.4 G).

Recommending a broker/insurance undertaking and providing customer with contact details (whether by phone, fax, e-mail, face-to-face or any other means of communication)

Yes, but article 72C may be available.

This will constitute making arrangements under article 25(2). But, the exclusion in article 72C will apply if all the intermediary does is supply information to the customer and the conditions of article 72C are otherwise met (see PERG 5.6.5 G to PERG 5.6.9 G). Generally, this will not amount to advice under article 53 unless there is an implied recommendation of a particular policy (see PERG 5.8.4 G), in which case article 72C would not be available.

Providing an insurance undertaking/broker with contact details of customer

Yes.

This will constitute making arrangements under article 25(2) when undertaken in the context of regular or ongoing arrangements for introducing customers. Article 72C will not apply because the information is supplied to someone other than the policyholder or potential policyholder.

Marketing on behalf of insurance undertaking to intermediaries only (for example, broker consultants)

Yes.

This amounts to work preparatory to the conclusion of contracts of insurance and so constitutes making arrangements under article 25(2). Article 72C is not available because this activity does not involve provision of information to the policyholder or potential policyholder only.

Telemarketing services (that is, companies specialising in marketing an insurance undertaking's products/services to prospective customers)

Yes.

This amounts to introducing and/or other work preparatory to the conclusion of contracts of insurance and so constitutes making arrangements under article 25(2). This could also involve article 25(1) arranging where the telemarketing company actually sells a particular policy and could involve advising on investments. Article 72C will not be available where the provision of information is more than incidental to the telemarketing company’s main business or where the telemarketing company is advising on investments.

PRE-PURCHASE DISCUSSIONS WITH CUSTOMERS AND ADVICE

Discussion with client about need for insurance generally/need to take out a particular type of insurance

Generally, no. Article 72C available if needed.

Not enough, of itself, to constitute making arrangements under article 25(2), but you should consider whether, viewed as a whole, your activities might amount to arranging. If so, article 72C might be of application (see PERG 5.6.5 G to PERG 5.6.9 G).

Advising on the level of cover needed

Generally, no. Article 72C available if needed.

Not enough, of itself, to constitute making arrangements under article 25(2), but you should consider whether, viewed as a whole, your activities might amount to making arrangements under article 25(2) (see PERG 5.8.3 G). If so, article 72C might be of application (see PERG 5.6.5 G to PERG 5.6.9 G).

Pre-purchase questioning in the context of filtered sales (intermediary asks a series of questions and then suggests several policies which suit the answers given)

Yes. Subject to article 72 C exclusion where available.

This will constitute arranging although article 72C may be of application (see PERG 5.6.5 G to PERG 5.6.9 G). If there is no express or implied recommendation of a particular policy, this activity will not amount to advice under article 53 (see PERG 5.8.15 G to PERG 5.8.19 G).

Explanation of the terms of a particular policy or comparison of the terms of different policies

Possibly. Article 72C available.

This is likely to amount to making arrangements under article 25(2). In certain circumstances, it could involve advising on investments (see PERG 5.8.8 G (Advice or information)). Where the explanation is provided to the potential policyholder, and does not involve advising on investments, article 72C may be of application (see PERG 5.6.5 G to PERG 5.6.9 G), and where information is provided by a professional in the course of a profession, article 67 may apply (see PERG 5.11.9 G to PERG 5.11.12 G).

Advising that a customer take out a particular policy

Yes.

This amounts to advice on the merits of a particular policy under article 53 (see PERG 5.8.4 G to PERG 5.8.5 G).

Advising that a customer does not take out a particular policy

Yes.

This amounts to advice on the merits of a particular policy under article 53 (see PERG 5.8.4 G to PERG 5.8.5 G).

Advice by journalists in newspapers, broadcasts etc.

Generally, no because of the article 54 exclusion.

Article 54 provides an exclusion for advice given in newspapers etc (see PERG 5.8.24 G to PERG 5.8.25 G).

Giving advice to a customer in relation to his buying a consumer product, where insurance is a compulsory secondary purchase and/or a benefit that comes with buying the product

Not necessarily but depends on the circumstances.

Where the advice relates specifically to the merits of the consumer product, it is possible that references to the accompanying insurance may be seen to be information and not advice. If, however, the advice relates, in part, to the merits of the insurance element, then it will be regulated activity.

ASSISTING CUSTOMERS WITH COMPLETING/SENDING APPLICATION FORMS

Providing information to customer who fills in application form

Possibly. Subject to article 67 or 72C exclusions where available.

This activity may amount to arranging although the exclusions in article 67 (see PERG 5.11.9 G to PERG 5.11.12 G) and article 72C (see PERG 5.6.5 G to PERG 5.6.9 G) may be of application.

Helping a potential policyholder fill in an application form

Yes.

This activity amounts to arranging. Article 72C will not apply because this activity goes beyond the mere provision of information to a policyholder or potential policyholder (see PERG 5.6.5 G to PERG 5.6.9 G).

Receiving completed proposal forms for checking and forwarding to an insurance undertaking (for example, an administration outsourcing service provider that receives and processes proposal forms)

Yes.

This amounts to arranging. Article 72C does not apply because this activity goes beyond the mere provision of information to a policyholder or potential policyholder (see PERG 5.6.5 G to PERG 5.6.9 G).

Assisting in completion of proposal form and sending to insurance undertaking

Yes.

This activity amounts to arranging. Article 72C does not apply because this activity goes beyond the mere provision of information (see PERG 5.6.5 G to PERG 5.6.9 G).

NEGOTIATING AND CONCLUDING CONTRACTS OF INSURANCE

Negotiating terms of policy on behalf of a customer with the insurance undertaking

Yes.

This activity amounts to arranging (see PERG 5.6.2 G).

Negotiating terms of policy on behalf of insurance undertaking with the customer and signing proposal form on his behalf

Yes.

These activities amount to both arranging and dealing in investments as agent.

Concluding a contract of insurance on insurance company’s behalf, for example, motor dealer who has authority to conclude insurance contract on behalf of insurance undertaking when selling a car

Yes.

A person carrying on this activity will be dealing in investments as agent. He will also be arranging (as the article 28 exclusion only applies in the limited circumstances envisaged under article 28(3)) (see PERG 5.6.12 G).

Agreeing, on behalf of a prospective policyholder, to buy a policy.

Yes.

A person who, with authority, enters into a contract of insurance on behalf of another is dealing in investments as agent under article 21, and will also be arranging.

Providing compulsory insurance as a secondary purchase

Yes. It will amount to dealing in investments as agent or arranging.

The fact that the insurance is secondary to the primary product does not alter the fact that arranging the package involves arranging the insurance.

COLLECTION OF PREMIUMS

Collection of cheque for premium from the customer at the pre-contract stage.

Yes (as part of arranging).

This activity is likely to form part of arranging. But the mere collection/receipt of premiums from the customer is unlikely, without more, to amount to arranging.

Collection of premiums at post-contract stage

No.

The mere collection of premiums from policyholders is unlikely, without more, to amount to assisting in the administration and performance of a contract of insurance.

MID-TERM ADJUSTMENTS AND ASSIGNMENTS

Solicitors or licensed conveyancers discharging client instructions to assign contracts of insurance.

Not where article 67 applies.

As the assignment of rights under a contract of insurance (as opposed to the creation of new contracts of insurance) does not fall within the IMD, article 67 is of potential application (see PERG 5.11.9 G to PERG 5.11.12 G).

Making mid-term adjustments to a policy, for example, property manager notifies changes to the names of the leaseholders registered as “interested parties” in the policy in respect of the property.

Yes.

Assuming the freeholder (as policyholder) is obliged under the terms of the policy to notify the insurance undertaking of changes to the identity of the leaseholders, the property manager is likely to be assisting in the administration and the performance of the contract of insurance.

TRADED ENDOWMENT POLICIES (“TEPs”)

Making introductions for the purposes of selling TEPs

Yes, unless article 72C applies.

Making introductions for these purposes is arranging unless article 72C applies (see PERG 5.6.5 G to PERG 5.6.9 G). The exclusions in article 29 (Arranging deals with or through authorised persons) and 33 (Introducing) no longer apply to arranging contracts of insurance.

Market makers in TEPs

Yes, although the exclusion in article 28 may apply.

Unauthorised market makers can continue to make use of the exclusions in articles 15 (Absence of holding out etc.) and 16 (Dealing in contractually based investments), where appropriate. In order to avoid the need for authorisation in respect of arranging they may be able to rely upon article 28 (see PERG 5.6.12 G).

ASSISTING POLICYHOLDER WITH MAKING A CLAIM

Merely providing information to the insured to help him complete a claim form

No.

Of itself, this is likely to amount to assisting in the administration but not the performance of a contract of insurance. In the FCA's view, the provision of information in these circumstances is more akin to facilitating performance of a contract of insurance rather than assisting in the performance (see PERG 5.7.3 G to PERG 5.7.5 G)

Completion of claim form on behalf of insured

Potentially.

This activity amounts to assisting in the administration of a contract of insurance. Whether this activity amounts to assisting in the administration and performance of a contract of insurance will depend upon whether a person's assistance in filling in a claims form is material to whether performance of the contractual obligation to notify a claim takes place (see PERG 5.7.2 G to PERG 5.7.3 G).

Notification of claim to insurance undertaking and helping negotiate its settlement on the policyholder's behalf

Yes.

This activity amounts to assisting in the administration and performance of a contract of insurance (see PERG 5.7.4 G).

ASSISTING INSURANCE UNDERTAKING WITH CLAIMS BY POLICYHOLDERS

Negotiation of settlement of claims on behalf of an insurance undertaking

No.

Claims management on behalf of an insurance undertaking does not amount to assisting in the administration and performance of a contract of insurance by virtue of the exclusion in article 39B (see PERG 5.7.7 G).

Providing information to an insurance undertaking in connection with its investigation or assessment of a claim

No.

This activity does not amount to assisting in the administration and performance of a contract of insurance.

Loss adjusters and claims management services (for example, by administration outsourcing providers)

Potentially.

These activities may amount to assisting in the administration and performance of a contract of insurance. Article 39B excludes these activities, however, when undertaken on behalf of an insurance undertaking only (see PERG 5.7.7 G).

Providing an expert appraisal of a claim

No.

This activity does not amount to assisting in the administration and performance of a contract of insurance whether carried out on behalf of an insurance undertaking or otherwise.

Jeweller repairs customer’s jewellery pursuant to a policy which permits the jeweller to carry out repairs

No.

This activity does not amount to assisting in the administration and performance of a contract of insurance. It amounts to managing claims on behalf of an insurance undertaking and so falls within the exclusion in article 39B (see PERG 5.7.7 G).

CREDS 10.1.3GRP

Module

Relevance to Credit Unions

The Principles for Businesses (PRIN)

The Principles for Businesses (PRIN) set out, high-level requirements, some of which are imposed by the FCA and some by the PRA.10 They provide a general statement of regulatory requirements. The Principles apply to all10credit unions. In applying the Principles to credit unions, the appropriate regulator10 will be mindful of proportionality. In practice, the implications are likely to vary according to the size of the credit union.

101010

Senior Management Arrangements, Systems and Controls (SYSC)

SYSC 1 and SYSC 4 to 10 apply to all credit unions in respect of the carrying on of their regulated activities and unregulated activities in a prudential context. SYSC 18 applies to all credit unions without restriction.

Threshold Conditions (COND)

In order to become authorised under the Act all firms must meet the threshold conditions. The threshold conditions must be met on a continuing basis by credit unions. Failure to meet one of the conditions is sufficient grounds for the exercise by the appropriate regulator10 of its powers.

1010

Statements of Principle and Code of Practice for Approved Persons (APER)

The purpose of the Statements of Principle contained in APER 2 is to provide guidance to approved persons in relation to the conduct expected of them in the performance of a controlled function. The Code of Practice for Approved Persons sets out descriptions of conduct which, in the opinion of the appropriate regulator10, do not comply with a Statement of Principle and, in the case of Statement of Principle 3, conduct which tends to show compliance within that statement.

10

The Fit and Proper test for Approved Persons (FIT)

The purpose of FIT is to set out and describe the criteria that the appropriate regulator10 will consider when assessing the fitness and propriety of a person in respect of whom an application is being made for approval to undertake a controlled function under the approved persons regime. The criteria are also relevant in assessing the continuing fitness and propriety of persons who have already been approved.

10

General Provisions (GEN)

GEN contains rules and guidance on general matters, including interpreting the Handbook, statutory status disclosure, the appropriate regulator's10 logo and insurance against financial penalties.

Fees manual (FEES)

This manual sets out the fees applying to credit unions.

Conduct of Business sourcebook (COBS)

A credit union which acts as a CTF provider or provides a cash-deposit ISA will need to be aware of the relevant requirements in COBS. COBS 4.6 (Past, simulated past and future performance), COBS 4.7.1 R (Direct offer financial promotions), COBS 4.10 (Systems and controls and approving and communicating financial promotions), COBS 13 (Preparing product information) and COBS 14 (Providing product information to clients) apply with respect to accepting deposits as set out in those provisions, COBS 4.1 and BCOBS.

Banking: Conduct of Business sourcebook (BCOBS)

BCOBS sets out rules and guidance for credit unions on how they should conduct their business with their customers. In particular there are rules and guidance relating to communications with banking customers and financial promotions (BCOBS 2), distance communications (BCOBS 3), information to be communicated to banking customers (BCOBS 4), post sale requirements (BCOBS 5), and cancellation (BCOBS 6). BCOBS 5.1.13 R (Value dating) does not apply to credit unions. The rules in BCOBS 3.1 that relate to distance contracts for accepting deposits are likely to have limited application to a credit union. This is because the Distance Marketing Directive only applies where there is "an organised distance sales or service-provision scheme run by the supplier" (Article 2(a)). If, therefore, the credit union normally operates face to face and has not set up facilities to enable customers to deal with it at a distance, such as facilities for a customer to deal with it purely by post, telephone, fax or the Internet, the provisions will not be relevant.

Supervision manual (SUP)

The following provisions of SUP are relevant to credit unions: 11SUP 1A11 (The appropriate regulator's10 approach to supervision), SUP 2 (Information gathering by the appropriate regulator10 on its own initiative), SUP 3.1 to SUP 3.8 (Auditors), SUP 5 (Skilled persons), SUP 6 (Applications to vary or cancel Part 4A10permission), SUP 7 (Individual requirements), SUP 8 (Waiver and modification of rules), SUP 9 (Individual guidance), 11SUP 10A and SUP 10B11 (Approved persons), SUP 11 (Controllers and Close links), SUP 15 (Notifications to the appropriate regulator10) and SUP 16 (Reporting Requirements).

Credit unions are reminded that they are subject to the requirements of the Act and SUP 11 on

controllers and close links, and are bound to notify the appropriate regulator10 of changes. It may be unlikely, in practice, that credit unions will develop such relationships. It is possible, however, that a person may acquire control of a credit union within the meaning of the Act by reason of holding the prescribed proportion of deferred shares in the credit union.

In relation to SUP 16, credit unions are exempted from the requirement to submit annual reports of

controllers and close links.

1010101010

Decision, Procedure and Penalties manual (DEPP)

DEPP is relevant to credit unions because it sets out:

(1) the FCA's10 decision-making procedure for giving statutory notices. These are warning notices, decision notices and supervisory notices (DEPP 1.2 to DEPP 5); and

(2) the FCA's10 policy with respect to the imposition and amount of penalties under the Act (see DEPP 6).

1010

Dispute Resolution: Complaints (DISP)

DISP sets out rules and guidance in relation to treating complainants fairly and the Financial Ombudsman Service.

Compensation (COMP)

COMP sets out rules relating to the scheme for compensating consumers when authorised firms are unable, or likely to be unable, to satisfy claims against them.10

The Enforcement Guide (EG)

The Enforcement Guide (EG) describes the FCA's10 approach to exercising the main enforcement powers given to it by the Act and by other legislation.2

10

Financial crime: a guide for firms (FC)

FC provides guidance on steps that a firm can take to reduce the risk that it might be used to further financial crime.