Related provisions for IPRU-INV 13.1A.19

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IPRU-INV 9.5.3RRP
Perpetual long-term subordinated loans and perpetual cumulative preference share capital may not be included in the calculation of own funds unless they meet the following requirements: (1) it may not be reimbursed on the holder's initiative or without the prior agreement of the FCA; (2) the instrument must provide for the firm to have the option of deferring the dividend payment on the share capital; (3) the shareholder's
IPRU-INV 9.5.4RRP
A firm may include a subordinated loan in the calculation of its own funds only: (a) if it is drawn up in accordance with the standard forms obtained from the FCA; (b) if it is signed by authorised signatories of all the parties; and (c) to the extent that it is fully paid up.
IPRU-INV 9.5.5RRP
A long-term subordinated loan may not be included in the calculation of own funds unless it meets the following requirements: (1) it must be fully paid-up; (2) it has an original maturity of at least five years; (3) the extent to which it may be used in the calculation of own funds shall be amortised on a straight line basis during at least the five years before repayment; and (4) it must not become repayable before the agreed repayment date other than in the
IPRU-INV 9.5.8RRP
(1) In calculating own funds: (i) the total amount of revaluation reserves, perpetual cumulative preference share capital, long-term subordinated loans, perpetual long-term subordinated loans and fixed term preference share capital must not exceed 100% of initial capital minus B; and (ii) the total amount of fixed term preference share capital and long-term subordinated loans must not exceed 50% of initial capital minus B.
(1) In calculating own funds:(i) the total amount of revaluation reserves, perpetual cumulative preference share capital, long-term subordinated loans and fixed term preference share capital must not exceed 100% of initial capital minus the sum of the items set out against B; and (ii) the total amount of fixed term preference share capital and long-term subordinated loans must not exceed 50% of initial capital minus the sum of the items set out against B.
2The conditions referred to in IPRU-INV 13.1A.19R are:(1) the subordinated loan must be fully paid up; (2) the subordinated loan must have an original maturity of at least five years or, where there is no fixed term, the subordinated loan must be subject to not less than five years' notice of repayment3;(3) the agreement governing the subordinated loan must only permit repayment3, prepayment or termination on:(a) maturity, or on expiration of the period of notice, if a firm has at
IPRU-INV 5.6.2RRP
A firm may only take into account the paid-up amount of a long term qualifying subordinated loan in the calculation of its own funds. This amount must be amortised on a straight-line basis over the five years prior to the date of repayment.

A firm must calculate its capital resources in accordance with table 13.15.3(1).

Table 13.15.3(1)

This table forms part of IPRU-INV 13.15.3R.

Capital resources

Companies

Sole traders: Partnerships

Paid-up share capital (excluding preference shares2 redeemable by shareholders2 within two years)

Eligible LLP members’ capital

Share premium account

Retained profits (see IPRU-INV 13.15.4R) and interim net profits (Note 1)

Revaluation reserves

Subordinated loans (see IPRU-INV 13.15.7R)

Debt capital

Balances on proprietor’s or partners’

- capital accounts2

- current accounts2

(see IPRU-INV 13.15.4R)

Revaluation reserves

Subordinated loans (see IPRU-INV 13.15.7R)

less

- Intangible assets

- Material current year losses

- Excess LLP members’ drawings

less

- Intangible assets

- Material current year losses

- Excess of current year drawings over current year profits2

Note 1

Retained profits must be audited and interim net profits must be verified by the firm's external auditor, unless the firm is exempt from the provisions of Part 16 of the Companies Act 2006 (section 477 (Small companies: Conditions for exemption from audit)) relating to the audit of accounts.

IPRU-INV 5.8.1RRP

1A firm must calculate its own funds and liquid capital as shown below, subject to the detailed requirements set out in IPRU-INV 5.8.2R.

Financial resources

Category

IPRU-INV 5.8.2R paragraph

Tier 1

(1)

Paid-up share capital (excluding preference shares)

A

(1A)

Eligible LLP members' capital

(2)

Share premium account

(3)

Reserves

2A

(4)

Non-cumulative preference shares

Less:

(5)

Investments in own shares

B

(6)

Intangible assets

(7)

Material current year losses

4

(8)

Material holdings in credit and financial institutions and, for exempt CAD firms only, material insurance holdings.

5 and 5A

(8A)

Excess LLP members' drawings

Tier 1 capital = (A-B)

C

Plus: TIER 2

1

(9)

Revaluation reserves

D

(10)

Fixed term cumulative preference share capital

1(a)

(11)

Long-term Qualifying Subordinated Loans

1(a); 6

(12)

Other cumulative preference share capital and debt capital but, for exempt CAD firms, only perpetual cumulative preference share capital and qualifying capital instruments

6A

(13)

Qualifying arrangements

7

"Own Funds" = (C+D)

E

Plus: TIER 3

(14)

Net trading book profits

F

1(b)(i); 8

(15)

Short-term Qualifying Subordinated Loans and excess Tier 2 capital

1(b)(ii); 1(c); 9

(16)

Illiquid assets

G

10

(17)

Qualifying Property

11

"Liquid Capital" = (E+F+G)

IPRU-INV 5.8.2RRP

1 Deductions and Ratios (Items 10, 11 and 15)

(a)

Notwithstanding IPRU-INV 5.8.1R and 5.8.2R for an exempt CAD firm, in calculating own funds, all of Item 8 must be deducted after the total of Tier 1 and Tier 2 capital and the following restrictions apply:

(i)

the total of fixed term cumulative preference shares (item 10) and long-term qualifying subordinated loans (item 11) that may be included in Tier 2 capital is limited to 50 per cent of Tier 1 capital;

(ii)

Tier 2 capital must not exceed 100 per cent of Tier 1 capital.

(b)

A firm which is not an exempt CAD firm and which is subject to a liquid capital requirement under IPRU-INV 5.4.1R may take into account qualifying subordinated loans in the calculation of liquid capital up to a maximum of 400% of its Tier 1 capital.

2 Non corporate entities

(a)

In the case of partnerships or sole traders, the following terms should be substituted, as appropriate, for items 1 to 4 in Tier 1 capital:

(i)

partners' capital accounts (excluding loan capital);

(ii)

partners' current accounts (excluding unaudited profits and loan capital);

(iii)

proprietors' account (or other term used to signify the sole trader's capital but excluding unaudited profits).

(b)

Loans other than qualifying subordinated loans shown within partners' or proprietors' accounts must be classified as Tier 2 capital under item 12.

(c)

For the calculation of own funds, partners' current accounts figures are subject to the following adjustments in respect of a defined benefit occupational pension scheme:

(i)

a firm must derecognise any defined benefit asset;

(ii)

a firm may substitute for a defined benefit liability the firm'sdeficit reduction amount. The election must be applied consistently in respect of any one financial year.

Note 1

A firm should keep a record of and be ready to explain to its supervisory contacts in the FCA the reasons for any difference between the deficit reduction amount and any commitment the firm has made in any public document to provide funding in respect of a defined benefit occupational pension scheme.

2A Reserves

For the calculation of own funds the following adjustments apply to the audited reserves figure:

(a)

a firm must deduct any unrealised gains or, where applicable, add back in any unrealised losses on cash flow hedges of financial instruments measured at cost or amortised cost;

(b)

in respect of a defined benefit occupational pension scheme, a firm must derecognise any defined benefit asset;

(c)

a firm may substitute for a defined benefit liability the firm's deficit reduction amount. The election must be applied consistently in respect of any one financial year.

Note 2

A firm should keep a record of and be ready to explain to its supervisory contacts in the FCA the reasons for any difference between the deficit reduction amount and any commitment the firm has made in any public document to provide funding in respect of a defined benefit occupational pension scheme.

(d)

a firm must not include any unrealised gains from investment property.

Note 3

Unrealised gains from investment property should be reported as part of revaluation reserves.

(e)

where applicable, a firm must deduct any asset in respect of deferred acquisition costs and add back in any liability in respect of deferred income (but exclude from the deduction or addition any asset or liability which will give rise to future cash flows), together with any associated deferred tax.

Note 4

Reserves must be audited unless the firm is exempt from the provisions of Part VII of the Companies Act 1985 (section 249A (Exemptions from audit)), or where applicable, Part 16 of the Companies Act 2006 (section 477 (Small companies: Conditions for exemption from audit)) relating to the audit of accounts.

3 Intangible assets (Item 6)

Intangible assets comprise:

(a)

formation expenses to the extent that these are treated as an asset in the firm's accounts;

(b)

goodwill, to the extent that it is treated as an asset in the firm's accounts; and

(c)

other assets treated as intangibles in the firm's accounts.

Intangible assets do not include a deferred acquisition cost asset.

4 Material current year losses (Item 7)

Losses in current year operating figures must be deducted when calculating Tier 1 capital if such losses are material. For this purpose profits and losses must be calculated quarterly or monthly, as appropriate. If this calculation reveals a net loss it shall only be deemed to be material for the purposes of this Table if it exceeds 10 per cent of the firm's Tier 1 capital.

5 Material holdings in credit and financial institutions (Item 8)

Material holdings comprise:

(a)

where the firm holds more than 10 per cent of the equity share capital of the institution, the value of that holding and the amount of any subordinated loans to the institution and the value of holdings in qualifying capital items or qualifying capital instruments issued by the institution;

(b)

in the case of holdings other than those mentioned in (a) above, the value of holdings of equity share capital in, and the amount of subordinated loans made to, such institutions and the value of holdings in qualifying capital items or qualifying capital instruments issued by such institutions to the extent that the total of such holdings and subordinated loans exceeds 10 per cent of the firm'sown funds calculated before the deduction of item 8.

5A Material insurance holdings (Item 8)

(a)

A material insurance holding means the holdings of an exempt CAD firm of items of the type set out in (b) in any:

(i)

insurance undertaking; or

(ii)

insurance holding company;

that fulfils one of the following conditions:

(iii)

it is a subsidiary undertaking of that firm; or

(iv)

that firm holds a participation in it.

(b)

An item falls into this provision for the purpose of (a) if it is:

(i)

an ownership share; or

(ii)

subordinated debt or another item of capital that forms part of the tier two capital resources that falls into GENPRU 2 or, as the case may be, INSPRU 7, or is an item of “basic own funds” defined in the PRA Rulebook: Glossary.

6 Long term qualifying subordinated loans (Item 11)

Loans having the characteristics prescribed by IPRU-INV 5.6.1R may be included in item 11, subject to the limits set out in paragraph (1) above.

6A Perpetual cumulative preference share capital

Perpetual cumulative preference share capital may not be included in the calculation of own funds by an exempt CAD firm unless it meets the following requirements:

(a)

it may not be reimbursed on the holder's initiative or without the prior agreement of the FCA;

(b)

the instrument must provide for the firm to have the option of deferring the dividend payment on the share capital;

(c)

the shareholder's claims on the firm must be wholly subordinated to those of all non-subordinated creditors;

(d)

the terms of the instrument must provide for the loss-absorption capacity of the share capital and unpaid dividends, whilst enabling the firm to continue its business; and

(e)

it must be fully paid-up.

7 Qualifying arrangements (Item 13)

(a)

An exempt CAD firm may only include a qualifying undertaking or other arrangement in item 13 if it is a qualifying capital instrument or a qualifying capital item.

(b)

A firm which is not an exempt CAD firm may only include qualifying undertakings in its calculation of liquid capital if:

(i)

it maintains liquid capital equivalent to 6/52 of its annual expenditure in a form other than qualifying undertakings; and

(ii)

the total amount of all qualifying undertakings plus qualifying subordinated loans does not exceed the limits set out in paragraph (1)(b) above.

8 Net trading book profits (Item 14)

For firms which are not exempt CAD firms unaudited profits can be included at item 14.

This Item must not be included in the liquid capital calculation of a firm whose permitted business includes establishing, operating or winding up a personal pension scheme.

Note 5

Non-trading book interim profits may only be included in Tier 1 of the calculation if they have been independently verified by the firm’s external auditors, unless the firm is exempt from the provisions of Part VII of the Companies Act 1985 (section 249A (Exemptions from audit)), or where applicable, Part 16 of the Companies Act 2006 (section 477 (Small companies: Conditions for exemption from audit)) relating to the audit of accounts.

For this purpose, the external auditor should normally undertake at least the following:

(a)

satisfy himself that the figures forming the basis of the interim profits have been properly extracted from the underlying accounting records;

(b)

review the accounting policies used in calculating the interim profits so as to obtain comfort that they are consistent with those normally adopted by the firm in drawing up its annual financial statements;

(c)

perform analytical review procedures on the results to date, including comparisons of actual performance to date with budget and with the results of prior periods;

(d)

discuss with management the overall performance and financial position of the firm;

(e)

obtain adequate comfort that the implications of current and prospective litigation, all known claims and commitments, changes in business activities and provisions for bad and doubtful debts have been properly taken into account in arriving at the interim profits; and

(f)

follow up problem areas of which the auditors are already aware in the course of auditing the firm’s financial statements.

A firm wishing to include interim profits in Tier 1 capital in a financial return should submit to the FCA with the financial return a verification report signed by its external auditor which states whether the interim results are fairly stated, unless the firm is exempt from the provisions of Part VII of the Companies Act 198 (section 249A (Exemptions from audit)), or where applicable, Part 16 of the Companies Act 2006 (section 477 (Small companies: Conditions for exemption from audit)) relating to the audit of accounts.

Profits on the sale of capital items or arising from other activities which are not directly related to the investment business of the firm may also be included within the calculation of liquid capital, but (unless the firm is exempt as above) only if they can be separately verified by the firm’s auditors. In such a case, such profits can form part of the firm’s Tier 1 capital as profits.

9 Short term qualifying subordinated loans (Item 15)

Loans having the characteristics prescribed by IPRU-INV 5.6.3R may be included in item 15 subject to the limits set out in paragraph (1) above. Tier 2 capital which exceeds the ratios prescribed by paragraph (1)(a) and (b) may be included in item 15 subject to paragraph (1) above.

10 Illiquid assets (Item 16)

Illiquid assets comprise:

(a)

tangible fixed assets.

Note 6

In respect of tangible fixed assets purchased under finance leases the amount to be deducted as an illiquid asset shall be limited to the excess of the asset over the amount of the related liability shown on the balance sheet.

(b)

holdings in, including subordinated loans to, credit or financial institutions which may be included in the own funds of such institutions unless they have been deducted under item 8;

(c)

any investment in undertakings other than credit institutions and other financial institutions where such investments are not readily realisable;

(d)

any deficiency in net assets of a subsidiary;

(e)

deposits not available for repayment within 90 days or less (except for payments in connection with margined futures or options contracts);

Note 7

Where cash is placed on deposit with a maturity of more than 90 days but is repayable on demand subject to the payment of a penalty, then this is not required to be deducted as an illiquid asset but a deduction is required for the amount of the penalty.

(f)

loans, other debtors and accruals not falling due to be repaid within 90 days or which are more than one month overdue by reference to the contractual payment date;

(g)

physical stocks (except where subject to the position risk requirement as set out in IPRU-INV 5.11; and

(h)

prepayments to the extent that the period of prepayment exceeds six weeks in the case of a firm subject to the 6/52 expenditure based requirement or thirteen weeks in the case of a firm subject to the 13/52 expenditure based requirement.

(i)

if not otherwise covered, any holding in eligible capital instruments of an insurance undertaking, insurance holding company, or reinsurance undertaking that is a subsidiary or participation. Eligible capital instruments include ordinary share capital, cumulative preference shares, perpetual securities and long-term subordinated loans that are eligible for insurance undertakings under INSPRU 1.

Illiquid assets do not include a defined benefit asset or a deferred acquisition cost asset.

11 Qualifying property (Item 17)

This item comprises the qualifying amount calculated in accordance with IPRU-INV 5.7.1R.

1The following words or terms throughout IPRU-INV 5 appearing in bold (other than headings and titles) are to have the meanings given to them below if not inconsistent with the subject or context. If a defined term is italicised the definition appearing in the main Handbook Glossary applies.

Term

Meaning

accounting reference date

means:

(a)

the date to which a firm's accounts are prepared in order to comply with the relevant Companies Act legislation. In the case of a firm not subject to Companies Act legislation, the equivalent date selected by the firm; and

(b)

in the case of an OPS firm which is not subject to the relevant Companies Act legislation, the date to which the accounts of the OPS in respect of which the firm acts are prepared.

annual expenditure

has the meaning given in IPRU-INV 5.5.1 (Determination).

category a body

means:

(a)

the government or central bank of a zone a country; or

(b)

EU or Euratom (the European Atomic Energy Community); or

(c)

the government or central bank of any other country, provided the receivable in question is denominated in that country's national currency.

category b body

means:

(a)

the European Investment Bank (EIB) or a multi-lateral development bank; or

(b)

the regional government or local authority of a zone a country; or

(c)

an investment firm or credit institution authorised in a zone a country; or

(d)

a recognised clearing house or exchange; or

(e)

an investment firm or credit institution authorised in any other country, which applies a financial supervision regime at least equivalent to the Capital Adequacy Directive.

counterparty

means any person with or for whom a firm carries on regulated business or an ancillary activity.

counterparty risk requirement

has the meaning given in IPRU-INV 5.11.1R (Counterparty risk requirement).

expenditure based requirement

means the requirement calculated in accordance with IPRU-INV 5.9.1R (Expenditure based requirement).

financial resources

has the meaning given in IPRU-INV 5.2.3R (Financial resources).

financial resources requirement

has the meaning given in IPRU-INV 5.4.1R (Determination of requirement).

financial resources rules

has the meaning given in IPRU-INV 5.2.

financial return

means quarterly financial return or monthly financial return as the case may be.

foreign exchange position

has the meaning given in IPRU-INV 5.14.1R (Foreign exchange requirement).

investment

means a designated investment in the main Glossary.

investment business

means designated investment business in the main Glossary.

investment firm

has the meaning given to investment firm in the main Glossary except that it excludes persons to which MiFID does not apply as a result of articles 2 or 3 of MiFID.

Note: An investment firm is not necessarily a firm for the purposes of the rules.

investment manager

means a person who, acting only on behalf of a customer, either:

(a)

manages an account or portfolio in the exercise of discretion; or

(b)

has accepted responsibility on a continuing basis for advising on the composition of the account or portfolio.

liquid capital

has the meaning given in IPRU-INV 5.3.1R (Calculation of own funds and liquid capital).

liquid capital requirement

has the meaning given in IPRU-INV 5.4.4R (Liquid capital requirement).

non-retail client

means a professional client or an eligible counterparty.

OPS or occupational pension scheme

means any scheme or arrangement which is comprised in one or more instruments or agreements and which has, or is capable of having, effect in relation to one or more descriptions or categories of employment so as to provide benefits, in the form of pensions or otherwise, payable on termination of service, or on death or retirement, to or respect of earners with qualifying service in an employment of any such description or category.

OPS firm

means:

(a)

a firm which:

(i)

carries on OPS activity but not with a view to profit; and

(ii)

is one or more of the following:

(A)

a trustee of the occupational pension scheme in question;

(B)

a company owned by the trustees of the occupational pension scheme in question;

(C)

a company which is:

(I)

an employer in relation to the occupational pension scheme in question in respect of its employees or former employees or their dependants; or

(II)

a company within the group which includes an employer within (I); or

(III)

an administering authority subject to the Local Government Superannuation Regulations 1986; or

(b)

a firm which:

(i)

has satisfied the requirements set out in (a) at any time during the past 12 months; but

(ii)

is no longer able to comply with those requirements because of a change in the control or ownership of the employer referred to in (a)(ii) during that period.

otc derivative

means interest rate and foreign exchange contracts covered by Annex III to the previous version of the Banking Consolidation Directive (i.e. Directive (2000/12/EC) and off balance sheet contracts based on equities which are not traded on a recognised or designated investment exchange or other exchange where they are subject to daily margin requirements, excluding any foreign exchange contract with an original maturity of 14 calendar days or less.

other assets requirement

has the meaning given in IPRU-INV 5.17.1R (Other assets requirement).

own funds

has the meaning given in IPRU-INV 5.3.1R and IPRU-INV 5.3.2R, as applicable.

own funds requirement

has the meaning given in IPRU-INV 5.4.3R and IPRU-INV 5.4.4R (Own funds requirement), as applicable.

permitted business

means regulated activity which a firm has permission to carry on.

position risk requirement

has the meaning given in IPRU-INV 5.11.1R (Position risk requirement).

prescribed subordinated loan agreement

means the subordinated loan agreement prescribed by the appropriate regulator for the purposes of IPRU-INV 5.6.4R.

qualifying capital instrument

means that part of a firm's capital which is a security of indeterminate duration, or other instrument, that fulfils the following conditions:

(a)

it may not be reimbursed on the bearer's initiative or without the prior agreement of the appropriate regulator;

(b)

the debt agreement must provide for the firm to have the option of deferring the payment of interest on the debt;

(c)

the lender's claims on the firm must be wholly subordinated to those of all non-subordinated creditors;

(d)

the documents governing the issue of the securities must provide for debt and unpaid interest to be such as to absorb losses, whilst leaving the firm in a position to continue trading; and

(e)

only fully paid-up amounts shall be taken into account.

qualifying capital item

means that part of a firm's capital which has the following characteristics:

(a)

it is freely available to the firm to cover normal banking or other risks where revenue or capital losses have not yet been identified;

(b)

its existence is disclosed in internal accounting records; and

(c)

its amount is determined by the management of the firm and verified by independent auditors, and is made known to, and is monitored by, the FCA.

Note: Verification by internal auditors will suffice until such time as EU provisions making external auditing mandatory have been implemented.

qualifying property

has the meaning given in IPRU-INV 5.7.1R (Qualifying property and qualifying amount defined).

qualifying subordinated loan

has the meaning given in IPRU-INV 5.6 (Qualifying subordinated loans).

qualifying undertaking

has the meaning given in IPRU-INV 5.7.3R (Qualifying undertakings).

readily realisable investment

means a unit in a regulated collective investment scheme, a life policy or any marketable investment other than one which is traded on or under the rules of a recognised or designated investment exchange so irregularly or infrequently:

(a)

that it cannot be certain that a price for that investment will be quoted at all times; or

(b)

that it may be difficult to effect transactions at any price which may be quoted.

regulated business

means designated investment business in the main Glossary.

relevant foreign exchange items

means:

(a)

all assets less liabilities, including accrued interest, denominated in the currency (all investments at market or realisable value);

(b)

any currency future, at the nominal value of the contract;

(c)

any forward contract for the purchase or sale of the currency, at the contract value, including any future exchange of principal associated with currency swaps;

(d)

any foreign currency options at the net delta (or delta-based) equivalent of the total book of such options;

(e)

any non-currency option, at market value;

(f)

any irrevocable guarantee;

(g)

any other off-balance sheet commitment to purchase or sell an asset denominated in that currency.

reporting currency

means the currency in which the firm's books of account are maintained.

specified trustee business

1.

means any investment business carried on in the UK by a trustee firm, but excluding each of the following activities:

(a)

Dealing or arranging deals in investments

(i)

where the deal is transacted or arranged by a trustee firm with or through a PTP; or

(ii)

where the dealing or arranging is done in the course of, or is incidental to, an activity of management falling within paragraph (b) below; or

(iii)

where the trust is a unit trust scheme and the deal is or the arrangements are made with a view to either an issue or sale of units in such a scheme to, or a redemption or repurchase or conversion of such units or a dealing in investments for such a scheme carried out by with or through, the operator or on the instructions of the operator; or

(iv)

where the trustee firm, being a bare trustee (or, in Scotland, a nominee) holding investments for another person, is acting on that person's instructions; or

(v)

where any arrangements do not or would not bring about the transaction in question.

(b)

Managing investments

(i)

where the trustee firm has no general authority to effect transactions in investments at discretion; or

(ii)

if and to the extent that all day-to-day decisions in relation to the management of the investments or any discrete part of the investments are or are to be taken by a PTP; or

(iii)

if and to the extent that investment decisions in relation to the investments or any discrete part of the investments are or are to be taken substantially in accordance with the advice given by a PTP; or

(iv)

where the trustee firm is a personal representative or executor and is acting in that capacity; or

(v)

where the trust is a unit trust scheme and all day-to-day investment decisions in the carrying on of that activity are or are to be taken by the operator of the scheme.

(c)

Investment advice

(i)

where the relevant advice:

(A)

does not recommend the entry into any investment transaction or the exercise of any right conferred by any investment to acquire, dispose of, underwrite or convert such an investment; and

(ii)

if and to the extent that the relevant advice is in substance the advice of a PTP; or

(iii)

where the relevant advice is given by the trustee firm acting in the capacity of personal representative or executor.

(d)

Establishing, operating or winding up a collective investment scheme including acting as trustee of an authorised unit trust scheme but only to the extent that such activities do not otherwise constitute specified trustee business.

(e)

Any trustee activity undertaken as trustee of an issue of debentures or government or public securities:

(i)

where the issue is made by a company listed on a recognised investment exchange or on a designated investment exchange (or by a wholly-owned subsidiary of such a company); or

(ii)

where the issue is listed or traded either on a recognised investment exchange or on a designated investment exchange or on the Société de la Bourse de Luxembourg; or

(iii)

where the issue is made by a government, local authority or international organisation; or

(iv)

where the aggregate amounts issued (pursuant to the trust deed or any deed supplemental thereto and ignoring any amounts redeemed, repurchased or converted) exceed the sum of £10,000,000.

2.

For the purpose of this definition of "specified trustee business":

(a)

a transaction is entered into through a person if that person:

(i)

enters into it as agent; or

(ii)

arranges for it to be entered into as principal or agent by another person and the arrangements are such that they bring about the transaction in question;

(b)

investment transaction means a transaction to purchase, sell, subscribe for or underwrite a particular investment and "investment decision" means a decision relating to an investment transaction;

(c)

debentures means any securities falling within article 77 of the RAO;

(d)

government or public securities means any securities falling within article 78) of the RAO;

(e)

government, local authority or international organisation means:

(i)

the government of the United Kingdom, of Northern Ireland, or of any country or territory outside the United Kingdom;

(ii)

a local authority in the United Kingdom or Anywhere; or

(iii)

an international organisation the members of which include the United Kingdom or another EEA State.

(f)

in determining the size of an issue of debentures or government or public securities made in a currency other than sterling, the amount of the issue shall be converted into sterling at the exchange rate prevailing in London on the date of issue.

total capital requirement

has the meaning given in IPRU-INV 5.4.5R (Total capital requirement).

trading book

in relation to a firm's business or exposures, means:

(a)

its proprietary positions in financial instruments:

(i)

which are held for resale and/or are taken on by the firm with the intention of benefiting in the short term from actual and/or expected differences between their buying and selling prices or from other price or interest-rate variations;

(ii)

arising from matched principal broking;

(iii)

taken in order to hedge other elements of the trading book;

(b)

exposures due to unsettled securities transactions, free deliveries, OTC derivative instruments, repurchase agreements and securities lending transactions based on securities included in (a)(i) to (iii) above, reverse repurchase agreements and securities borrowing transactions based on securities included in (a)(i) to (iii) above; and

(c)

fees, commission, interest and dividends, and margin on exchange-traded derivatives which are directly related to the items included in (a) and (b) above.

trustee activity

means, in relation to a firm, any activity undertaken in the course of or incidental to the exercise of any of its powers, or the performance of any of its duties, when

unit trust manager

means the manager of a unit trust scheme.

zone b country

means a country which is not a Zone A country in the Glossary.