Related provisions for CREDS 2.2.64

1 - 20 of 24 items.

Search Term(s)

Filter by Modules

Filter by Documents

Filter by Keywords

Effective Period

Similar To

To access the FCA Handbook Archive choose a date between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2004 (From field only).

SYSC 13.8.3GRP
SYSC 3.2.19 G provides high level guidance on business continuity. This section provides additional guidance on managing business continuity in the context of operational risk.
SYSC 13.8.4GRP
The high level requirement for appropriate systems and controls at SYSC 3.1.1 R applies at all times, including when a business continuity plan is invoked. However, the FCA1 recognises that, in an emergency, a firm may be unable to comply with a particular rule and the conditions for relief are outlined in GEN 1.3 (Emergency).
SYSC 13.8.5GRP
A firm should consider the likelihood and impact of a disruption to the continuity of its operations from unexpected events. This should include assessing the disruptions to which it is particularly susceptible (and the likely timescale of those disruptions) including through:(1) loss or failure of internal and external resources (such as people, systems and other assets);(2) the loss or corruption of its information; and(3) external events (such as vandalism, war and "acts
SYSC 13.8.6GRP
A firm should implement appropriate arrangements to maintain the continuity of its operations. A firm should act to reduce both the likelihood of a disruption (including by succession planning, systems resilience and dual processing); and the impact of a disruption (including by contingency arrangements and insurance).
SYSC 13.8.7GRP
A firm should document its strategy for maintaining continuity of its operations, and its plans for communicating and regularly testing the adequacy and effectiveness of this strategy. A firm should establish:(1) formal business continuity plans that outline arrangements to reduce the impact of a short, medium or long-term disruption, including:(a) resource requirements such as people, systems and other assets, and arrangements for obtaining these resources;(b) the recovery
SYSC 13.8.8GRP
The use of an alternative site for recovery of operations is common practice in business continuity management. A firm that uses an alternative site should assess the appropriateness of the site, particularly for location, speed of recovery and adequacy of resources. Where a site is shared, a firm should evaluate the risk of multiple calls on shared resources and adjust its plans accordingly.
SYSC 4.1.-2GRP

21For a common platform firm:

  1. (1)

    the MiFID Org Regulation applies, as summarised in SYSC 1 Annex 1 3.2G, SYSC 1 Annex 1 3.2-AR and SYSC 1 Annex 1 3.2-BR; and

  2. (2)

    the rules and guidance apply as set out in the table below:

    Subject

    Applicable rule or guidance

    General requirements

    SYSC 4.1.1R, SYSC 4.1.1CR, SYSC 4.1.2R, SYSC 4.1.2AAR

    Business continuity

    SYSC 4.1.6R, SYSC 4.1.7R, SYSC 4.1.8G

    Audit committee

    SYSC 4.1.11G, SYSC 4.1.13G, SYSC 4.1.14G

    Persons who effectively direct the business

    SYSC 4.2.1R, SYSC 4.2.2R, SYSC 4.2.3G, SYSC 4.2.4G, SYSC 4.2.5G, SYSC 4.2.6R

    Responsibility of senior personnel

    SYSC 4.3.3G

    Management body

    SYSC 4.3A.-1R to SYSC 4.3A.7R

    Nominations committee

    SYSC 4.3A.8R to SYSC 4.3A.11R

    Management responsibilities maps for UK relevant authorised persons

    SYSC 4.5

    Management responsibilities maps for non-UK relevant authorised persons

    SYSC 4.6

    Senior management responsibilities for UK relevant authorised persons

    SYSC 4.7

    Handover procedures and material

    SYSC 4.9

SYSC 4.1.6RRP
A common platform firm must take reasonable steps to ensure continuity and regularity in the performance of its regulated activities. To this end the common platform firm3 must employ appropriate and proportionate systems, resources and procedures.[Note: article 1621(4) of MiFID]
SYSC 4.1.7RRP
A CRR firm21 and a management company10 must establish, implement and maintain an adequate business continuity policy aimed at ensuring, in the case of an interruption to its systems and procedures, that any losses are limited, the preservation of essential data and functions, and the maintenance of its regulated activities, or, in the case of a management company, its collective portfolio management activities,10 or, where that is not possible, the timely recovery of such data
SYSC 4.1.7AGRP
3Other firms should take account of the business continuity rules (SYSC 4.1.6 R and 4.1.7 R) as if they were guidance (and as if "should" appeared in those rules21 instead of "must") as explained in SYSC 1 Annex 1 3.3 R(1)21.5
SYSC 4.1.8GRP
The matters dealt with in a business continuity policy should include:(1) resource requirements such as people, systems and other assets, and arrangements for obtaining these resources;(2) the recovery priorities for the firm's operations; (3) communication arrangements for internal and external concerned parties (including the FCA21, clients and the press);(4) escalation and invocation plans that outline the processes for implementing the business continuity plans, together with
SYSC 4.1.8CGRP
16Arrangements to ensure P2P agreements facilitated by the firm continue to be managed and administered may include:(1) entering into an arrangement with another firm to take over the management and administration of P2P agreements if the operator ceases to operate the electronic system in relation to lending; or(2) holding sufficient collateral in a segregated account to cover the cost of management and administration while the loan book is wound down; or(3) entering into an
SYSC 13.9.4GRP
Before entering into, or significantly changing, an outsourcing arrangement, a firm should:(1) analyse how the arrangement will fit with its organisation and reporting structure; business strategy; overall risk profile; and ability to meet its regulatory obligations;(2) consider whether the agreements establishing the arrangement will allow it to monitor and control its operational risk exposure relating to the outsourcing;(3) conduct appropriate due diligence of the service
SYSC 13.9.5GRP
In negotiating its contract with a service provider, a firm should have regard to:(1) reporting or notification requirements it may wish to impose on the service provider;(2) whether sufficient access will be available to its internal auditors, external auditors or actuaries (see section 341 of the Act) and to the FCA2 (see SUP 2.3.5 R (Access to premises) and SUP 2.3.7 R (Suppliers under material outsourcing arrangements);(3) information ownership rights, confidentiality
SYSC 13.9.8GRP
A firm should ensure that it has appropriate contingency arrangements to allow business continuity in the event of a significant loss of services from the service provider. Particular issues to consider include a significant loss of resources at, or financial failure of, the service provider, and unexpected termination of the outsourcing arrangement.
CREDS 2.2.61GRP
The policy and procedures manual should cover all aspects of the credit union's operations, including matters such as:(1) cash handling and disbursements;(2) collection procedures;(3) lending, (see CREDS 7.1 to CREDS 7.2)5;(4) arrears management (see CREDS 7.2.9 G to CREDS 7.2.10 G);(5) provisioning5;(6) liquidity management5;(7) financial risk management5;(8) money laundering prevention (see SYSC 6.3);(9) internal audit (see CREDS 2.2.40 G to CREDS 2.2.50 G);(10) information
CREDS 2.2.62GRP
Guidance on business continuity is located in SYSC 4.1.6R to SYSC 4.1.8 G.[Note: As explained in SYSC 1 Annex 1.3.3G, SYSC 4.1.6R is to be read as guidance rather than as a rule, and as if "should" appeared in that provision instead of "must".]
CREDS 2.2.63GRP
A credit union should put in place contingency arrangements to ensure that it could continue to operate and meet its regulatory requirements in the event of an unforeseen interruption that may otherwise prevent the credit union from operating normally (for example, if there was a complete failure of IT systems or if the premises were destroyed by fire).
MAR 7A.3.3RRP
A firm must:(1) have in place effective business continuity arrangements to deal with any failure of its trading systems; and(2) ensure that its systems are fully tested and properly monitored to ensure that it meets the requirements of (1) and of MAR 7A.3.2R. [Note: article 17(1) of MiFID and MiFID RTS 6 specifying the organisational requirements of investment firms engaged in algorithmic trading]
MAR 7A.3.7RRP
A firm must provide the following, at the FCA’s request, within 14 days from receipt of the request: (1) a description of the nature of its algorithmic trading strategies; (2) details of the trading parameters or limits to which the firm’s system is subject; (3) evidence that MAR 7A.3.2R (systems and controls) and MAR 7A.3.3R (business continuity and system tests) are met; (4) details of the testing of the firm’s systems; (5) the records in MAR 7A.3.8R(2) (accurate and time-sequenced
SYSC 13.7.1GRP
A firm should establish and maintain appropriate systems and controls for managing operational risks that can arise from inadequacies or failures in its processes and systems (and, as appropriate, the systems and processes of third party suppliers, agents and others). In doing so a firm should have regard to:(1) the importance and complexity of processes and systems used in the end-to-end operating cycle for products and activities (for example, the level of integration of systems);(2)
SYSC 13.7.2GRP
Internal documentation may enhance understanding and aid continuity of operations, so a firm should ensure the adequacy of its internal documentation of processes and systems (including how documentation is developed, maintained and distributed) in managing operational risk.
SYSC 13.4.2GRP
Regarding operational risk, matters of which the FCA1 would expect notice under Principle 11 include:(1) any significant operational exposures that a firm has identified;(2) the firm's invocation of a business continuity plan; and(3) any other significant change to a firm's organisation, infrastructure or business operating environment.
MAR 9.4.1GRP
(1) 1The FCA expects to have an open, cooperative and constructive relationship with data reporting services providers to enable it to understand and evaluate data reporting services providers’ activities and their ability to meet the requirements in the DRS Regulations. As part of that relationship the FCA expects a data reporting services provider to provide it with information about any proposed restructuring, reorganisation or business expansion which could have a significant
REC 3.16.1GRP
The purpose of REC 3.16 is to ensure that the FCA1receives a copy of the UK recognised body's plans and arrangements for ensuring business continuity if there are major problems with its computer systems. The FCA1does not need to be notified of minor revisions to, or updating of, the documents containing a UK recognised body's business continuity plan (for example, changes to contact names or telephone numbers). [Note:MiFID RTS 7 requires that the operator of a trading venue assess
REC 2.5.1UKRP
Schedule to the Recognition Requirements Regulations, paragraphs 3 – 3H4Paragraph 3 – Systems and controls4(1)The [UK RIE] must ensure that the systems and controls, including procedures and arrangements,4 used in the performance of its functions and the functions of the trading venues it operates are adequate, effective4 and appropriate for the scale and nature of its business.(2)Sub-paragraph (1) applies in particular to systems and controls concerning - (a)the transmission
REC 2.5.19GRP
Where MiFID RTS 7 does not apply to a UK RIE, the FCA may in addition have regard to the performance, capacity and reliability of its systems.4 The FCA3 may also have regard to the arrangements for maintaining, recording and enforcing technical and operational standards and specifications for information technology systems, including:3(1) the procedures for the evaluation and selection of information technology systems;(2) the arrangements for testing information technology systems
SUP 1A.3.1GRP
The FCA will adopt a pre-emptive approach which will be based on making forward-looking judgments about firms' business models, product strategy and how they run their businesses, to enable the FCA to identify and intervene earlier to prevent problems crystallising. The FCA's approach to supervising firms will contribute to its delivery against its objective to protect and enhance the integrity of the UK financial system (as set out in the Act). Where the FCA has responsibilities
ICOBS 8.4.9RRP
The conditions referred to in ICOBS 8.4.4R (2)(d) and ICOBS 8.4.7R (1)(a)(ii) are that the tracing office is one which:(1) maintains a database which:(a) accurately and reliably stores information submitted to it by firms for the purposes of complying with these rules;(b) has systems which can adequately keep it up to date in the light of new information provided by firms;(c) has an effective search function which allows a person inputting data included on the database relating
COLL 5.7.11GRP
An authorised fund manager carrying out due diligence for the purpose of the rules in this section should make enquiries or otherwise obtain information needed to enable him properly to consider:(1) whether the experience, expertise, qualifications and professional standing of the second scheme's investment manager is adequate for the type and complexity of the second scheme;(2) the adequacy of the regulatory, legal and accounting regimes applicable to the second scheme and its
SYSC 13.6.2GRP
A firm should establish and maintain appropriate systems and controls for the management of operational risks that can arise from employees. In doing so, a firm should have regard to:(1) its operational risk culture, and any variations in this or its human resource management practices, across its operations (including, for example, the extent to which the compliance culture is extended to in-house IT staff);(2) whether the way employees are remunerated exposes the firm to the
SYSC 4 Annex 1GRP

Business areas and management functions

Explanation

(1) Payment services

This means:

(1) payment services;

(2) issuing and administering other means of payment (for example, cheques and bankers' drafts);

(3) issuing electronic money; and

(4) current accounts.

(2) Settlement

This means clearing and settlement of any transactions described in rows (3) and (6) to (9) of this annex, in relation to the assets covered by (9).

It also includes clearing and settlement of any transactions described in row (10).

(3) Investment management

This has the same meaning as managing investments with the following adjustments:

(a) it covers all types of assets; and

(b) the exclusions in the Regulated Activities Order do not apply.

It also covers fund management.

(4) Financial or investment advice

This includes advising on investments.

(5) Mortgage advice

This has the same meaning as advising on regulated mortgage contracts but is expanded to cover land anywhere in the world and to cover security of any kind over land.

(6) Corporate investments

This means acquiring, holding, managing and disposing a firm's investments made for its own account.

(7) Wholesale sales

This means the selling of any investment to a person other than a retail customer.

It does not include the activities in (1).

(8) Retail sales

This means the selling of any investment to a retail customer.

It includes savings accounts. It does not include the activities in (1).

(9) Trading for clients

This means dealing in investments as agent and execution of orders on behalf of clients but the list of products includes money market instruments and foreign exchange.

(10) Market making

This has the same meaning as it does in MIFID (see the definition of market maker in article 4.1(8)).

(11) Investment research

(12) Origination/syndication and underwriting

Origination and syndication include:

(1) entering into or acquiring (directly or indirectly) any commitment or investment with a view to transferring some or all of it to others, or with a view to others investing in the same transaction;

(2) sub-participation; and

(3) any transaction described in the Glossary definition of originator.

Underwriting includes underwriting that is not on a firm commitment basis.

A commitment or investment includes an economic interest in some or all of it.

This activity also includes the provision of services relating to such transactions.

(13) Retail lending decisions

Deciding whether, and on what terms, to lend to retail customers.

Lending includes granting credit, leasing and hire (including finance leasing).

(14) Wholesale lending decisions

Deciding whether, and on what terms, to lend to persons who are not retail customers.

Lending includes granting credit, leasing and hire (including finance leasing).

(15) Design and manufacturing of products intended for wholesale customers

Wholesale customers mean persons who are not retail customers

(16) Design and manufacture of products intended for retail customers

(17) Production and distribution of marketing materials and communications

This includes financial promotions

(18) Customer service

This means dealing with clients after the point of sale, including queries and fulfilment of client requests

(19) Customer complaints handling

This includes the firm's compliance with DISP.

It also includes:

(1) any similar procedures relating to activities that do not come under the jurisdiction of the Financial Ombudsman Service;

(2) activities that take place outside the UK; and

(3) activities that are not subject to any ombudsman service.

(20) Collection and recovering amounts owed to a firm by its customers

Dealing with customers in arrears

‘Customer’ means any person falling into any of the definitions of client in the Glossary so far as they apply to the FCA's Handbook. The definition is extended to cover all services provided by the firm and not just those that are provided in the course of carrying on a regulated activity or an ancillary service.

(21) Middle office

This means risk management and controls in relation to, and accounting for, transactions in securities or derivatives

(22) The firm's information technology

(23) Business continuity planning

This means the functions described in SYSC 4.1.6R and SYSC 4.1.7R

(24) Human resources

This includes recruitment, training and competence and performance monitoring

(25) Incentive schemes for the firm's staff

This is not limited to schemes based on sales.

(26) Providing information in relation to a specified benchmark

(27) Administering a specified benchmark

Note (1): The purpose of this annex is explained in SYSC 4.5 (Management responsibilities maps for UK2 relevant authorised persons) and SYSC 4.7.37G. This annex is also referred to in SYSC 4.6 (Management responsibilities maps for non-UK relevant authorised persons) and SYSC 4.8 (Senior management responsibilities for third-country relevant authorised persons: allocation of responsibilities) (see SYSC 4.6.14 and SYSC 4.8.35).2

Note (2): A firm does not have to use the split of activities in this annex for the purposes in Note (1). If a firm does decide to use it, it may adapt it to suit its management arrangements better.

For example, a firm may find the split of activities into retail and wholesale activities unsuitable. If so, the firm might:

(a) treat retail and wholesale activities together; or

(b) use its own definition of retail and wholesale activities.

MAR 8.3.2RRP
In discharging its duties, the benchmark administrator must have regard to the importance of maintaining integrity of the market and the continuity of the specified benchmark including the need for contractual certainty for contracts which reference the specified benchmark.
MAR 5.3A.2RRP
MAR 5.3A.1R applies in particular to systems and controls concerning:(1) the resilience of the firm’s trading systems;(2) its capacity to deal with peak order and message volumes;(3) the ability to ensure orderly trading under conditions of severe market stress;(4) the effectiveness of business continuity arrangements to ensure the continuity of the MTF’s services if there is any failure of its trading systems, including the testing of the MTF’s systems and controls;(5) the ability
SYSC 3.2.19GRP
A firm, other than a Solvency II firm,15 should have in place appropriate arrangements, having regard to the nature, scale and complexity of its business, to ensure that it can continue to function and meet its regulatory obligations in the event of unforeseen interruption. These arrangements should be regularly updated and tested to ensure their effectiveness. Solvency II firms are subject to the business continuity requirements in PRA Rulebook: Solvency II firms: Conditions
MAR 5A.5.2RRP
MAR 5A.5.1R applies in particular to systems and controls concerning: (1) the resilience of the firm’s trading systems;(2) its capacity to deal with peak order and message volumes;(3) the ability to ensure orderly trading under conditions of severe market stress;(4) the effectiveness of business continuity arrangements to ensure the continuity of the OTF’s services if there is any failure of its trading systems, including the testing of the OTF’s systems and controls;(5) the ability
DEPP 6.5D.4GRP
(1) The FCA3 will consider reducing the amount of a penalty if a firm will suffer serious financial hardship as a result of having to pay the entire penalty. In deciding whether it is appropriate to reduce the penalty, the FCA3 will take into consideration the firm’s financial circumstances, including whether the penalty would render the firm insolvent or threaten the firm’s solvency. The FCA3 will also take into account its statutory objectives3, for example in situations where